Dating policy at work

However, employment of family members in situations where one family member has direct influence over the other's conditions of employment (i.e., salary, hours worked, shifts, etc.) is inappropriate.For the purpose of this policy, family members are defined as spouse, domestic partner, daughter, son, parent, grandparent, grandchild, sister, brother, mother-in-law or father-in-law.

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If nobody seems to notice, there's no reason to share. You and your new partner need to agree on some ground rules and come up with a plan for how you will keep it professional and stay within written or unwritten rules. "You may have the burden of overcompensating with professionalism and keeping an artificial distance, which can be an awkward strain," says Taylor.

"What will be your plan 'B' if the heat is on from a supervisor, from gossip, or if things go awry? "Better to overcompensate than to constantly test the limits of workplace etiquette while hoping for the best." Be sensitive and respectful to others.

Quick backstory: We didn't meet on the job — we were dating for almost four years before we started working together (which, by the way, wasn't planned … But for about 11 months, we sat three cubes apart from one another and kept our relationship under wraps. People sometimes act differently at work than they do in their personal life. No need to send a blast email with "the news" of you and your cube-mate's new relationship.

But they happen all the time, and when they do, there are three possible outcomes: The relationship turns sour and your reputation and career take a beating; it ends, but you're both mature and cordial and don't let the breakup affect your work; or A survey by Career Builder last year revealed that nearly 40% of employees admitted to having a romantic relationship with a coworker, and almost one-third of office relationships result in marriage. We are getting married in two months.) It's up to you to figure out whether pursuing an office relationship is worth the possible consequences, good and bad. My situation was unique because we were already a couple before we started working together — but generally that isn't the case, and Lynn Taylor, a national workplace expert and the author of "Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant: How to Manage Childish Boss Behavior and Thrive in Your Job," suggests you try being friends in-and-outside the office before you make any moves.

Just know the risks." Your decision not only affects you, but other person, both your careers, and those around you.

"A word to the wise: If you take the leap, go into it with your eyes wide open," Taylor concludes.Employees who engage in personal relationships (including romantic and sexual relationships) should be aware of their professional responsibilities and will be responsible for assuring that the relationship does not raise concerns about favoritism, bias, ethics and conflict of interest.In cases of doubt, advice and counsel should be sought from the next level of administrator, Employee Relations or the Employee Opportunity, Affirmative Action and Disability Services (EAD). Romantic or sexual relationships between employees where one individual has influence or control over the other's conditions of employment are inappropriate."The bottom line is, you need to tread carefully," she adds."If, however, love happens to strike at work, don't make a concerted effort to fight it at any cost.Supervisors may approve non-routine visits that do not interfere with an employee's ability to perform his/her work functions or the productivity of a work unit.

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