Dating soldier deployed

I hadn’t heard from him for over three weeks, and I was so worried. Lots of military members do use dating sites to meet people in their community. They pay bills online, buy items from websites and even arrange for car loans. Service members do not have to pay for internet connections, food or travel expenses etc. Even if a service member misses a connecting flight, the military takes care of this. Liars love to claim they are in Delta Force, Army Rangers, Navy Seals or Special Ops. Military members can be sent on an unaccompanied tour for a year or two.

Two days ago, he called me and said he needs money so he can come home. But you should know that bad guys use dating sites, too. If this “service member” swears he loves you and wants to marry you before he has even met you, beware. Report him to the website and stop communicating with him. Just because someone you met online gives you a name, rank, duty station or even military ID card, that doesn’t mean that this is a real person. If they ask you for money -- even a loan, this is a scam. During a year-long deployment, service members may be sent home for R&R. Commanding officers in the United States military do not call girlfriends, fiancées or family members asking for money. If someone you met online claims to be stranded in an airport, do not send them money. If these individuals really were in special ops, they would never tell you -- never. Deployments in the past have lasted up to fifteen months. If your family and friends think this is a scam, it is.

He responded that he would rather forget about the phone than to lose me. His commander contacted me and said he still needs $12,000 before he can be released. He has been through so much on these deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan.

It’s so unfair that the military would put all of these restrictions on them before releasing them.

He is a lieutenant colonel in the army and stationed at Fort Campbell.

We have been communicating online for the past year.

Thank you for your support as we establish the identity and culture of the #1SFAB. What’s more, popular culture refers to SF by that term thanks to a popular song and book turned movie. When the Olive Drab beret was combined with an arrowhead-shaped Shoulder Sleeve Insignia complete with tab ala SF and USASOC as well as the self-appointed nickname of “The Legion” (the actual nickname for the 5th SFG(A)), it all added up to appear that Big Green was attempting to steal SF’s lineage for this new unit.

To make matters worse, the 1st SFAB was stood up to conduct a mission long accomplished by SF.Instead, in 2000, former CSA Shinseki awarded the Black Beret worn for decades by the 75th Ranger Regt, to the Army as a standard headgear, and issued the Tan Beret to the Rangers instead, complete with a contrived backstory.Soldier and Rangers alike still grumble over that fiasco.On Monday, Army Chief of Staff, GEN Mark Milley, himself SF qualified and a veteran of 5th Group, responded to concerns in a phone interview with Army Times.Bottom line, GEN Milley has taken responsibility for the situation, explained that it was unintentional and directed the 1st SFAB to find a new nickname.Finally, he referred to the beret as an Olive Brown color, patterned after a British Army Beret but acknowldeged that the shade may appear Green.

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