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Netscape Communications then decided that the scripting language they wanted to create would complement Java and should have a similar syntax, which excluded adopting other languages such as Perl, Python, TCL, or Scheme.

Java Script began to acquire a reputation for being one of the roadblocks to a cross-platform and standards-driven Web.

Some developers took on the difficult task of trying to make their sites work in both major browsers, but many could not afford the time.

First, Brendan Eich and Mozilla rejoined Ecma International as a not-for-profit member and work started on ECMAScript for XML (E4X), the ECMA-357 standard, which came from ex-Microsoft employees at BEA Systems (originally acquired as Crossgain).

This led to working jointly with Macromedia (later acquired by Adobe Systems), who were implementing E4X in Action Script 3 (Action Script 3 was a fork of original ECMAScript 4).

The original ECMAScript 4 work led by Waldemar Horwat (then at Netscape, now at Google) started in 2000 and at first, Microsoft seemed to participate and even implemented some of the proposals in their JScript . Over time it was clear though that Microsoft had no intention of cooperating or implementing proper Java Script in Internet Explorer, even though they had no competing proposal and they had a partial (and diverged at this point) implementation on the . So by 2003, the original ECMAScript 4 work was mothballed.

The next major event was in 2005, with two major happenings in Java Script's history.The internal codename for the company's browser was Mozilla, which stood for "Mosaic killer", as the company's goal was to displace NCSA Mosaic as the world's number one web browser.The first version of the Web browser, Mosaic Netscape 0.9, was released in late 1994.There is a common misconception that Java Script was influenced by an earlier Web page scripting language developed by Nombas named Cmm (not to be confused with the later C-- created in 1997).Microsoft script technologies including VBScript and JScript were released in 1996.Within four months it had already taken three-quarters of the browser market and became the main browser for the Internet in the 1990s.

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